Thursday, July 21, 2016

Tasmania Part 6: A Day Trip To Southwest National Park

We were excited that Tim could join us today and take a trip to the southwestern part of the island.
Southwest National Park is part of the Tasmanian World Heritage Site.   It is perhaps one of the largest untouched areas in the world.  Created as a biosphere in 1977, it is generally remained untouched.

The tiny locality of Melaleuca in the extreme south-west provides an airstrip and some very basic facilities, mainly to service the National Park Service.

That is where we landed today to take the water portion of our adventure.

The red dotted line shows the flight path we took today, landing in the southwest corner.

The water is very  concentrated with tannins from the local trees which gives it the rusty color.


Our pilot told us that the water is very rusty (and freshwater) on top, then saltwater layered below.
This lures sea life that would generally be found only in much deeper water.

A view of our sand/gravel landing strip.  This is composed of the calcium-laden rock seen in the mountains.

Our boat.

We had a Jenison skipper for a small part of our trip while the pilot did something up front.

Our pilot discusses the area we are touring

On top of a high hill during our hike.

Same hill.

This is a black swan beginning its water takeoff

Black swan, becoming airborne.

Reindeer moss. My daughter tells me it is very slow-growing and this is probably quite old.

The raised walkway along the shoreline.

More moss.  I thought it made these trees look like they are wearing leg-warmers.


Standing on the raised walkway over the shoreline.

We had another wallaby encounter!

We stopped at a strange little spot near the airstrip, complete with boat house and cabin.


Note the rusty water...

During the flight back to Hobart....



There were many glacier-created lakes.


The causeway over Derwent River in Hobart.



5 comments:

  1. Oh my gosh! Your photos are beautiful and so interesting. I particularly liked your commentaries. Thanks for sharing your fantastic family adventure!

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    1. Thanks for traveling along with me, Relishing Life. Great handle, BTW....

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  2. one question: that tannin ladened water, was it salt or fresh water?

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    1. We were told that the tannin-laden water is fresh, and is actually a separate layer on the surface, the sea water residing deeper below.

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  3. I have enjoyed all of your posts so much! The landscape, museum, and the plane ride - wow! I appreciate you sharing your trip with us.

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