Thursday, June 28, 2012

The Sketchbook Challenge Book Blog Hop


The winner of the drawing is Joy Manoleros!  You are the winner of the wonderful package from Mistyfuse!  Joy, please contact Sue Bleiweiss at sue@suebleiweiss.com and let her know you won the drawing on my blog for the Mistyfuse package and she will make arrangements to send it to you.  Thank you, everyone, for stopping by the blog and leaving a comment.  It was great fun to hear from you!


Welcome to the Sketchbook Challenge blog hop, Day #3!  
As many of you know I have been a contributing artist to the Sketchbook Challenge blog for the past 18 months.  When Sue Bleiweiss asked me to participate in the book project I was thrilled.  I created mixed media work for the chapter on "Simple Pleasures".
It is my great pleasure to show you a couple of tips using Mistyfuse.  I have been a huge fan of Mistyfuse for a long time.
One of the best things about the product is how versatile it is for the mixed media artist.  Not only is it fabulous with all types of cloth (including silk organza!) but it works with a variety of papers, as well.
I have two questions for you:  1) Are you a "Mistyfuser"?, and 2) have you ever tried using Mistyfuse for any unusual projects?  Please take a moment to comment at the end of the post so you can be eligible to win a gift from Mistyfuse!

I would like to show you a quick little tutorial about how I like to cut from a roll of Mistyfuse with my rechargeable scissors.  Obviously, any scissors will work for this, but I find it very handy to use these scissors when I am fusing a lot of cloth:  it is easier to quickly cut a piece of fusible, fuse, and move to the next area.
 Mistyfuse is unrolled over the surface of my fabric

Using my rechargeable scissors I can quickly cut my piece of Mistyfuse quite close to the edge of my cloth, taking care not to cut my teflon Goddess sheet underneath!

Once cut, I position a second Goddess sheet over the surface.
This protects both my ironing board as well as my iron from any errant fusible.

The the iron on a medium-high dry setting, I move around the surface.
It is not necessary to hold the iron in place for a long period of time.


Once fused, peel the top teflon sheet (or kitchen parchment paper works well, too)
from the surface of the fused fabric

Note the "sheen" on the fused side of the cloth.
This is important to note so you will position the fused side down on your project!

Another little tip:  I keep a green pot scrubber near my work area.
After I peel off the fused cloth from both top and bottom pressing sheets 
I quickly (and lightly) scrub the surface of the sheets to assure that any small bits of fusible left behind are removed.  

Here is what happens when you pick up the fusible from the teflon sheet:
it makes a little roll, which is easily pulled off the scrubber

Once fused, it is very easy to rotary cut or die cut the cloth!

Here is a piece of synthetic sheer that has been previously painted with
several layers of acrylic paint.

Mistyfuse was applied to one side in preparation for fusing it to a piece of watercolor paper.

Here is my piece of watercolor paper.
It was an "unloved" plein-air painting that had several layers of both watercolor and 
acrylic paint


The fused sheer if placed on the surface.

Teflon goddess sheet is both under and over the two pieces....

The iron fuses the sheer to the paper.

And now the sheer looks nicely integrated to the watercolor paper!  
I like using sheers on both paper and cloth because I love the layered effect.

I use a lot of fused "scraps" in my sketchbooks as an unusual layer that adds a great deal of texture.  Mistyfuse can also be used to fuse paper to paper, as well as paper to cloth.  
I will be interested to know all the different ways you have used Mistyfuse.  Don't forget to 
leave a comment at the end of the post!

In the meantime, I hope you will consider picking up a copy of "The Sketchbook Challenge" book.  You will find that, in addition to the beautiful photography of the artwork, there are loads of wonderful tips in the book that will help you in your artful journey.


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Please visit these other blog hop participants:
June 26:
Jill Berry  http://jillberrydesign.com/blog/
Sue Bleiweiss http://www.suebleiweiss.com/blog

June 27:
Violette   http://www.violette.ca/
Kathyanne White http://kathyanneart.blogspot.com/

June 28:
Kathy Sperino http://finishinglinesbyksperino.blogspot.com/

June 29:
Jamie Fingal http://jamiefingaldesigns.blogspot.com/
Lynn Krawczyk  http://fibraartysta.blogspot.com/

July 2:
Jackie Bowcutt http://stitchworks-jackie.blogspot.com/
Lyric Kinard http://lyrickinard.blogspot.com/

July 3:
Jane Davies http://janedavies-collagejourneys.blogspot.com/
Kim Rae Nugent http://kimraenugent.blogspot.com/

July 5:
Carla Sonheim  www.carlasonheim.wordpress.com/
Carol Sloan  www.carolbsloan.blogspot.com/

July 6:
Susan Brubaker Knapp  http://wwwbluemoonriver.blogspot.com/
Diana Trout dianatrout.typepad.com

July 9:
Tracie Lyn Huskamp  www.thereddoor-studio.blogspot.com/
Judi Hurwitt  www.approachable-art.blogspot.com

July 10:
Jane LaFazio http://janeville.blogspot.com/
Kelli Nina Perkins: http://ephemeralalchemy.blogspot.com/






Thank you to our generous sponsors!
The Sketchbook Challenge Book blog hop is sponsored by:

Mistyfuse http://www.mistyfuse.com

ArtPlantae Today http://artplantaetoday.com/

Gelli Arts http://www.gelliarts.com/

Joggles http://www.joggles.com

Sue Pelland Designs http://suepellanddesigns.com/

ProChemical and Dye http://prochemicalanddye.com/home.php

The Thread Studio http://www.thethreadstudio.com/

Blue Twig Studio http://www.bluetwigstudio.com/

The Artist Cellar http://artistcellar.com/



My giveaway:
From Mistyfuse (www.mistyfuse.com)  A 10yd combination package of Mistyfuse that includes 6 yards of White and 2 yards each of Black and Ultraviolet and a Goddess Sheet.  Total retail value: $48!
In order for a chance to win, you need to leave a comment before midnight CDT on June 30th.  The winner will be chosen randomly from the comments left on this post. 
Thank you so much for dropping by.  I hope you will stop by often!  
Yay!

129 comments:

  1. Haven't tried Mistyfuse before, but looks interesting. Thanks

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  2. Mistyfuse is one of those products I've heard of but never gotten around to trying. Fusing fabric and paper like that looks intriguing and something I would do.

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  3. Thanks for the tips. The cutting is a great help. Love your work.

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  4. I use Misty fuse for everything I fuse. Small bits torn just to hold something down. Paper, leather, cardboard, you name it. Love it Buy the bolt.

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  5. Thanks for the tutorial, no I have never used Misty Fuse, but sure would like to, and will next time I go to the store, sound interesting, or maybe I can win some....thanks again....

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  6. I use loads of misty fuse but not sure if any of myuses are unusual. Thanks for the tutorial and the tip about the pan scrubber. I am always amazed at the generosity of artists. Many thanks again.

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  7. Thanks for the Misty Fuse tips. I have only used it a few times and get a little frustrated.. I will take some advice from your tips and try to make friends with it.

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  8. I'm definitely a Mistyfuse user. Love that stuff. I can't say that I've used it in any unconventual way, but it's great stuff! Love your scrubby tip!

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  9. I have never used misty fuse, would love to try it on my projects. I use a product that I find too stiff with the heavyweight and hard to peel on the light, so love to learn about new products that I can use.

    Debbie

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  10. great tip about the scrubbie! I'm going to have to break down and buy some Mistyfuse - the product I've been using gums up my needles and frustrates me terribly ;-)

    Edie

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  11. Great tutorial, and the idea about the scrubbie thing! Genius!

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  12. I had heard a lot of people talk about Mistyfuse, but never seen such an easy-to-understand tutorial on it. I might have to pick some up now - thanks!

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  13. I have wondered how Mistyfuse works. Thanks for the detailed tutorial:)

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  14. Thanks for the great info on Mistyfuse. I have used only the white so far but I love it. (Fingers crossed that I could WIN some!) The scrubber tip is a real GEM!

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  15. Thanks for the great information on working with Mistyfuse!

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  16. Thank you for the mini tutorial, always nice to learn more technique.

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  17. Just what I need more art supplies - hooray! Beautiful work! Can't wait to get my hands on the book.

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  18. I love Misty Fuse too! It works great with foil candy wrappers and felt. I think I like using it on paper even better than fabric. I'm looking forward to seeing the book.

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  19. I'm glad to see I'm not the only one who didn't really have a handle on what Misty fuse could be used for! Thanks for the tutorial. I think it would be useful for collages (and that's how I would use it!).

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  20. Great tutorial. I think you have finally convinced me to switch fusibles!

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  21. fantastic tutorial. Looking forward to trying your ideas..

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  22. I've never used Mistyfuse before but after your wonderful tutorial I can see that I'll have to get myself some. So many possibilites for it!

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  23. Thanks for the tutorial. I used Mistyfuse for the first time a couple months ago on a portrait quilt. It was so easy to quilt through. There was no residue at all on the needle. Love it.

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  24. I have used fusibles but never Mistyfuse. I am going to have to try it! Your tutorial is inspiring. Thank you for sharing your art with us. Cant wait to get the book!

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  25. Great tutorial! I use Misty Fuse for all of my raw edge appliqué projects, like my portrait quilts of reality show villains!

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  26. Nice tutorial, I use misty fuse for all my fusing needs. Most recently on some lutrador.

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  27. I'm new to Misty Fuse, purchased it recently at the IQF in Cincinnati. I like it for sheers and silks. Thanks for the opportunity.

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  28. I have only used Misty fuse with fabric but LOVE it. It is practically undetectable. Will definitely need to try it with paper. great tutorial!

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  29. Thanks for the tip on the scrubby. I love Misty Fuse, and use the black extensively. I've always ended up using my finger nail to scrub off any left on the sheet. Not fun!

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  30. I have never used Mistyfuse! Think I need to head out today and pick some up. Thanks for the tutorial.

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  31. I have use something like Misty fuse. I made inchies for a swap.

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  32. Thanks for the tutorial. I've been wanting to try Mistyfuse.

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  33. I love the tutorial on the Mistyfuse as I have never seen or tried it!! it looks amazing!! I am loving the blog hop and learning new things! I will be looking to get the new book as well soon!! thnx for sharing!!

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  34. I love Mistyfuse! thanks for the tutorial, and the scrubby reminder...

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  35. I am so thrilled that such wonderful artists came together for this book. By innitially knowing one of you I am now being introduce to the others and being exposed to so much wonderful art! Thank you all!

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  36. Thanks for all the info and for sharing with all. We here in South Africa are not always able to obtain all these wonderful goodies so to win a piece to explore all the possibilities would be wonderful. Lovely meeting you here on your blog, will be hopping back soon.
    Heather B Cape Town South Africa

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  37. This is a great tutorial -- I've been wanting to try MistyFuse, and this is very inspiring.

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  38. Love the tips! I have never thought of using a scrubby to get the little bits of sticky. Great idea.

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  39. Fascinating, I will have to play around with your technique, always love new textures and effects. Winning the give-away would be lovely! Debbie Bein

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  40. I'm embarrassed to say that I haven't used Mistyfuse yet. It's been on my "to do" list forever, but those who know me know that my "to do" list is v-e-r-y long. I have heard and seen such good things about Mistyfuse, I m-u-s-t use it very soon in a project!

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  41. I keep hearing about Mistyfuse and what to try it. Fingers crossed! Thank you!

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  42. Leslie you are so talented. thanks for sharing.

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  43. I love Mistyfuse for mixed media techniques..especially with Angelina fibers and sparkly stuff! :-)

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  44. Mistyfuse is the best! Thanks for the tips.

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  45. I like adhering Misty Fuse to the top of velvet and then painting it with metallic paint.

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  46. Thank you for your tips. I love Misty Fuse. Now I know how much more I can do with it.

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  47. Thanks for the great tutorial. Misty Fuse is the best!

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  48. Great tips! Can't wait to see the book.
    Erin

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  49. I really appreciate professional artists sharing with and encouraging other artists.

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  50. Beautiful cant wait to learn all this fun stuff from all the blogs! Thanks for chance to win !

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  51. Very interesting - I never thought of adding fused fabrics.

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  52. Thanks for the tutorial. I havn't used misty fuse yet. Would love to win some to give it a try

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  53. wow - what a great tutorial. I haven't tried this misty fuse material yet. Loving these bloghops, meeting so many new artists and learning a lot. Signed up for the next sketchbook challenge for 2013 --- some great ideas!! THANK YOU

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  54. Great tutorial, Leslie. I am an avid user of MistyFuse and the most unusual thing I have done with it is use it as the batting layer of a transparent quilt. I have also used it to fuse transparent pieces which resemble Chihuly's glass works.

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  55. Hmmm, I may have to rethink fusing. I have stayed away from it because I do a lot of hand stitching. I hadn't thought about using it in a journal. Thanks for the tut!

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  56. I have used Misty Fuse, but only once. I need to order some because I love how light it is. I love that it doesn't gum up the sewing machine needle, too!

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  57. Oh, be still my heart, people. You have some great ideas, and I'm excited that some of you who haven't tried Mistyfuse yet are thinking about it. You will LOVE. IT.
    And for those of you who have experienced stiff fabrics and sticky needles? Those days are over, people. Welcome to a new and better world of fusible
    possibilities!
    Keep those comments coming!
    ltj

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  58. This is fabulous! I haven't used it... never even thought of using it in my journal... wow! Thanks for the tutorial and the generous giveaway! I would love to win... sigh... a girl can hope.

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  59. I love Misty Fuse and am learning of more and more ways to use it. The most interesting for me (maybe old hat for you) was when I used it to make a snowy egret with silk fibers and yarn. Turned out really well. Tried to attach here but couldn't figure it out. Thanks for sharing your tips and techniques.

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  60. I love Misty Fuse but have never tried it on paper-will now! Thanks for the tip about the electric scissors.

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  61. Your blog is new to me..thanks to the hop! :) I'm really enjoying it. Please enter me in your giveaway.

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  62. I've never used Misty Fuse before. This technique has possibilities. My book came today and I'm getting offline now to start reading! Thanks for the chance to win.

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  63. haven't played a lot with Misty Fuse but looking forward to trying it.

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  64. I love using misty fuse to hold the sandwiching together on all my art quilts instead of pins!

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  65. Misty Fuse is amazing stuff. This prize rocks!

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  66. Congratulations on The Sketchbook Challenge book! What a great idea! I love Misty Fuse and use it a lot. I like to fuse two layers of organza together to minimize the fraying. Misty leaves a wonderful faint textured look behind the organza.

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  67. Have used bondaweb in England ..Is is the same?I have applied silk paints straight to the bondaweb and then ironed that onto both fabric and paper to good effect.

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  68. I am so enjoying the challenge part of the Sketchbook Challenge! It has definitely encouraged me to draw things way outside of my comfort zone! I currently do not use MistyFuse, but I would love to give it a try to find out if I, too, will be hooked!

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  69. I've never used Misty Fuse but I've used Bondaweb, which I think is similar. In a class we were shown how to paint the Bondaweb then tear it up and apply it to backing fabric.

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  70. I've wanted to try Misty Fuse.

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  71. Thank you for the wonderful tutorial! Sheers on paper what a wonderful idea! from a fellow schnauser owner!

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  72. I want to try using Misty fuse to "baste" a quilt. Sue's book looks like it is full of inspiration and interesting techniques.....really enjoying this blog hop.....finding some new (to me) must read blogs. :-)

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  73. I am also a misty-fuse user. And thanks for the tip about the green scrubbie- brilliant!
    Love your work..

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  74. I love Misty fuse and Sue's new book is awesome!

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  75. I am just learning about Mistyfuse. I have started using it with sheers. I'm going to be doing a journal ovser the summer and will probably try using it for that. I sometimes find it hard to use as it is soft and fly away.
    gjeneve@gmail.com

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  76. I've used Misty Fuse in my art quilts. I love the way it really bonds and leaves the art piece feeling soft. I've also used it with silk sheers and gauze. You can't tell it's there.

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  77. I have never used Mistyfuse, would love to try it.

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  78. I have used many fusibles but never Misty Fuse. I would love to give it a try.

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  79. I used black mistyfuse under black tulle to give an additional level of shadow between layers of a project. It was perfect for that. I love Mistyfuse but find myself hoarding it for "special" projects rather than for everyday use! This prize package is very, very generous. Thanks for a chance to win it!

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  80. I'm just enjoying this blog hop & stopped in to say hello...

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  81. I am enjoying this blog hop so much! I love Mistyfuse! I have used both black and white under tulle to add shadows and light to my art quilts. I really like the way it stays soft and disappears. This is a very generous giveaway! Thank you for the opportunity to win!

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  82. Misty Fuse Fan here. When you asked if I had a unique use for it, I immediately thought of using it on sheers, not realizing that is what your tutorial would be about. Still found it fascinating as I had not thought of using sheer fabric on paper. I use sheers and Misty Fuse a lot for "bindings." Great book. My copy arrived several days ago from Amazon. I'm still pouring over it.

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  83. I love to use Black Misty Fuse on anything transparent - fabric or papers.
    It adds texture and shading easily.
    Nothing else can do this.

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  84. very nice tutorial. thanks for the chance.

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  85. This is wonderful! I love MistyFuse, but had no idea it worked on paper, too. Thanks for the tutorial!

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  86. I'd love to try MistyFuse in my journals! Great idea, and great tutorial!

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  87. What a fun hop!

    Detailed tutorial! Thank you for sharing with usl

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  88. I've used Mistyfuse - it's a great product. I've taken a few online classes from Sue, so I've used it in all of those classes, mainly for books and also a vase.

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  89. Nice tip about keeping the scrubber close by. I always leave some Misty Fuse remnants around. Thanks for the giveaway!

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  90. Love the tips for using Misty Fuse. Great stuff! Thanks for sharing :)

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  91. I've never used Misty Fuse and had no idea how to until I read your blog entry. It looks like really cool stuff. Thanks for the opportunity to enter the drawing!

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  92. I LOVE MistyFuse with fabric-have yet to try it on paper. Think I will.................thanks for the tips!

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  93. I love Mistyfuse and could sure use a Goddess Sheet! I have been fusing fabric to painted wood. Works wonderfully.

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  94. Your tutorial is so well explained. Thanks for the tip.

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  95. This seems like a really useful product. Thanks for the tutorial. :)

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  96. I do the exact same thing you just showed so well, Leslie, but I then go back into the piece and free-motion stitch or hand-stitch a final layer. Thanks for the photos.

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  97. Thanks for the great tutorial. Mistyfuse is a wonderful product.

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  98. The Misty Fuse is a good product to use, when you have it in hand, and I would love that opportunity. It's always good to get another idea about how that is used for all kinds of different efforts or reasons. Please count me in!

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  99. Must say I have not tried Misty Fuse, but after seeing it in action (and your great simple how to) I can't wait to try it. I'm loving the blog hop and the book (preordered from Amazon) too. Great idea and wonderful inspiration!

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  100. Now I know...thanks for the great tutorial on using Mistyfuse. And a chance to win...oh boy!

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  101. What great information on how to use misty fuse.
    I must admit I have a small package but I have not used it much yet. I have used stitchwhitery, and steam a seam. Hope to use misty fuse this summer when I am on vacation and have time to create more.

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  102. You have a good blog. Thanks for the tutorial and the chance.

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  103. I've never worked with Mistyfuse before! Would love to try it based on your tips. And the scrubber idea--genius! Thanks Leslie.

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  104. I love mistyfuse, and I am almost out! I've been following the challenge and enjoyed the 1st book, looking forward to #2. Keep up the good work.

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  105. I really want some Mistyfuse, now! This is so inspiring!

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  106. I would love to try misty fuse. I will have to follow your blog more. It's great.

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  107. I've always wanted to buy Misty Fuse, but was not sure how to use.Thanks for the tips.I would luv to play & work with Misty Fuse. Can't wait to order Sketch Book Challenge!

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  108. I use misty fuse and like the fact that is so light. Thanks for the tips which I know will help me use it more easily.

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  109. I have to study this - the results look amazing. Thanks for the detailed instructions.

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  110. I haven't used misty fuse. Thanks for the info and the giveaway!

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  111. Wonderful directions--I haven't used Mistyfuse before, but your tutorial definitely makes me not only want to try, but feel like I CAN!

    :)

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  112. I am most definitely a Mistyfuse fan! I first used it in conjunction with a class I took from Sue Bleiweiss, and I've been using it ever since. I save all of the scraps, since you can layer and overlap the pieces without adding any bulk to your project. Thanks for offering a giveaway!

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  113. I would love to try Mistyfuse instead of another fusible brand. It sounds like the product is much lighter and easier to handle. Thanks for the chance.

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  114. I just received my book in the mail. it's a read, read, read. Wonderful ideas and great instructions. Thank you for this opportunity.

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  115. I have never had the opportunity to play with Misty Fuse, but now I've seen your tips I know I want some! The book is already on my wish list.

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  116. I'm hopping all over to get my hands on more Mistyfuse. I love it.

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  117. I have tried Misty Fuse a couple times... Would love a chance to win some more to play with!

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  118. I LOVE mistyfuse, use mostly for applique but have used with Angelina fibers with great results; haven't used in any interesting ways. thanks for the change to win.

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  119. I must confess the er of my ways...I have never used any fusible but after your little tutorial I am intrigued. I don't do standard quilting at the moment rather being quite involved in mixed media and handmade books. Now I want to try MistyFuse in my mixed media, well, and my book arts! Thanks for the tutorial, who knew? LOL!
    Hugs,
    Beth P
    P.S. I will be picking up a copy of Sue's new book soon!

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  120. I have never used Mistyfuse, but I am intrigued by. It's possibilities for mixed media. Thanks for the tutorial.

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  121. This book is fabulous with amazing creative ideas. Thank you for this opportunity.

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  122. I'd love some mistyfuse to try this fabulous project, thanks ;)

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  123. Hi Leslie
    Stopping by to congratulate you on your contributing art for the Sketchbook Challenge book! Beautiful and inspiring work! Thank you for the well-done Mistyfuse tutorial! I'm looking forward to trying it

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  124. Thanks so much, everyone, for stopping by and leaving a comment. I announced the winner at the top of this post. Please stop by often and stay in touch!

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